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  (49) Cash Out Refinance – Home Equity Mortgage Loan or Cash Out Refinance

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There are some definite benefits to doing a cash out refinance. Just make sure that overall you are not going to be spending more money in fees and interest doing a cash out refinance as opposed to a home equity loan. When you do a cash out refinance, you are refinancing your entire loan. Let's say you owe $300,000 on your home and you want to get $10,000 in cash out. If in refinancing your rate will be the same or higher, then you will be losing an extraordinary amount of money in fees just to get a $10,000 loan. In a case like that, you would definitely want to go with a home equity loan.
Home equity loans are better if:
1. You have a large home loan yet only need to cash out of a small amount of equity 2. You need to borrow up to 100% of the equity in your home 3. You want a revolving credit line 4. You want a payoff sooner, or longer than the term of the rest of your mortgage loan
On the other hand if you are:
1. Going to refinance anyway 2. Wanting to borrow a large percentage of your home’s equity 3. Refinancing for a much lower rate
Then, a cash out refinance loan may be best for you. Of course, the best way to tell is to actually sit down and do the math. These are just guidelines; the real test is in the math. You can consult a refinance calculator and a home equity loan calculator and figure out which one will save you the most money in the long run. Compare the total amounts you will spend in interest and fees. If you are planning on a cash out refinance, make sure that you are refinancing with a low enough rate to justify the fees to refinance. Your loan specialist should be able to help you figure out which one is best for your needs.
For a list of recommended Refinance Lenders or if you would like to use a mortgage calculator to help you compare a home equity or refinance loan for your cash needs, click here: www.abcloanguide.com/refinance.shtml


About the Author
Carrie Reeder is the owner of www.abcloanguide.com. ABC Loan Guide is an informational loan website with informative articles and suggested mortgage lenders. ABC loan guide has listed recommended refinance lenders to help you with your needs.
Written by: Carrie Reeder


(50)Cash Out Refinance Mortgage Loans – Home Equity, 2nd Mortgage Or Cash Out Refinance Loan


There are some definite benefits to doing a cash out refinance. Just make sure that overall you are not going to be spending more money in fees and interest doing a cash out refinance as opposed to a home equity loan. When you do a cash out refinance, you are refinancing your entire loan. Let's say you owe $300,000 on your home and you want to get $10,000 in cash out. If in refinancing your rate will be the same or higher, then you will be losing an extraordinary amount of money in fees just to get a $10,000 loan. In a case like that, you would definitely want to go with a home equity loan.

Home equity loans are better if:

1. You have a large home loan yet only need to cash out of a small amount of equity

2. You need to borrow up to 100% of the equity in your home

3. You want a revolving credit line

4. You want a payoff sooner, or longer than the term of the rest of your mortgage loan

On the other hand if you are:

1. Going to refinance anyway

2. Wanting to borrow a large percentage of your home’s equity

3. Refinancing for a much lower rate

Then, a cash out refinance loan may be best for you. Of course, the best way to tell is to actually sit down and do the math. These are just guidelines; the real test is in the math. You can consult a refinance calculator and a home equity loan calculator and figure out which one will save you the most money in the long run. Compare the total amounts you will spend in interest and fees. If you are planning on a cash out refinance, make sure that you are refinancing with a low enough rate to justify the fees to refinance. Your loan specialist should be able to help you figure out which one is best for your needs.


About the Author
To see a list of recommended mortgage loan companies who can offer cash out options online, visit this page: www.abcloanguide.com/mortgageloans.shtml - Carrie Reeder is the owner of ABC Loan Guide. It is an informational loan website, with informative articles and the latest finance news.

Written by: Carrie Reeder
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(51)Cash Out Refinance - Things To Know About Refinancing Your Mortgage To Get Cash Out


A cash-out mortgage allows you to refinance your mortgage and pull out part of your equity. Before deciding how much to cash to use, be aware of the impact of PMI and equity amounts. However, you may find the benefits of refinancing outweigh the costs.

Cash-Out Mortgage Basics

With a cash-out mortgage, you can refinance for lower rates or to just get part of your equity out. Once the refinancing process is completed, you will end up with a check. You can decide to take up to 90% of your home's equity in some cases. However, cashing-out a large percent of your home's value will impact your refinancing rate and might require you to carry private mortgage insurance (PMI).

The Cost Of PMI

Just like with a regular mortgage, you will be required to carry PMI if you take out more than 80% of the home's value. PMI protects the mortgage lender since there is a higher risk of default with such loans. You will pay premiums when the loan closes and with each month's mortgage payment. PMI can easily add up to hundreds a year.

You can also drop PMI once you build up your principal to 20% or the home appreciates so that your equity is over 20%. With home appreciation, you will have to pay for an appraiser's inspection. You will also have to make an official request to the mortgage lender to drop PMI.

Higher Rates

You may also find yourself paying higher interest rates, at least a quarter percent, for cashing out over 75% of your home's value. Lenders charge higher rates because there is an increased risk level. Your credit history will also be a factor in the type of financial package you qualify for.

Benefits Of Cashing-Out

While there are costs associated with a cash-out mortgage, you should also remember the benefits. You can write off the interest on your taxes and you qualify for lower rates than with other types of credit. You can also spread out your payments over a longer period, lessening the monthly financial burden.

Taking out more than 75% of your home's equity is not necessarily a bad decision. You just need to weigh the financial costs. You may find that in the long-run, tapping into your home equity is better than the other types of credit available to you. You may also discover that the tax benefits offset the slightly higher costs.


About the author:

View our recommended mortgage Refi lenders. Carrie Reeder is the owner of ABC Loan Guide, an informational website about various types of loans.

Written by: Carrie Reeder


:(52)Cash-out refinance: Turning lemons into lemonade


The oft given, rarely followed adage, "Turn Lemons into Lemonade" seems out of place in the world of refinance. But in fact, it is quite appropriate when considering entering into a Cash Out refinance loan. A Cash Out Refinance loan is simply a loan typically on the equity in a home, which is for greater than the amount actually owed on the home. The difference between the actual amount owed and the amount of the new loan, is returned to the buyer in the form of a "cash out". For example, lets imagine a couple has spent the last 10 years making monthly payments on their $100,000 home loan. By now they have paid $50,000 on their mortgage and owe another $50,000 when the house's title shifts to them and the house officially becomes theirs. At that 10 year mark, however, something happens. Someone gets sick and suddenly the couple needs to come up with $20,000 to pay the medical bills. So, they look to Cash Out Refinancing.
Cash Out Refinace: The Negatives As you can likely imagine, those who avail themselves of cash-out refinancing are usually financial trouble. Because this trait is pretty common among individuals who seek out a Cash Out Refinance, there are higher default rates associated with those that take out the loans. This higher default rate allows banks to charge higher finance and interest rates on these loans. So, under the above example, what would typically happen, is that the Cash Out Refinance Lender would pay off the old loan of $50,000 and write up a new loan for somewhere in the vicinity of $80,000. They would then write a check to the couple for $20,000, allowing them to pay off the medical bills. Meanwhile, they would pocket $10,000 for conducting the transaction. The lending agency will then set the couple up with a variable interest rate which on average is significantly higher than the rate they had under their original mortgage. Ultimately, the couple will end up paying an extra $35,000 to $45,000 over the life of the loan for the opportunity to cash out $20,000 of their own money. As should be clear by now, this is not usually a good deal for the borrower.
Cash Out Refinance: The Positives But the reality is, incidents occur in which families need a lot of money in a very short period of time. Cash Out Refinancing is one way to get that money. If you find yourself in such a situation, you should know that there are a few steps you can take to minimize the damage. The first is that you must look at the total amount being refinanced. If, like the couple above, you owe $50,000, and you are getting $20,000 in cash out, any refinancing above $70,000 (50,000 + 20,000) is money that the lender is sticking in his pocket. Seek out multiple bids to find the lowest number. But keep in mind that you will have to go over the contract with a fine toothed comb to find this number as lenders typically try to hide and/or muddle it inside the contract. The next, and potentially most important step, is to seek out a similarly formatted interest rate.
The Refinancers Pitch What refinancing companies often try to do is entice you by telling you that your monthly payment will actually go down after the Cash Out Refinancing. This is always too good to be true. What lenders do, is backload your payments, so that for the first year or so your payments may actually be lower. But look at years 5 - 10 of your loan and you will find that you are paying much more than you anticipated. They do this knowing full well that you will not be able to make the big payments later on down the mortgage, and that you will be left with just one option, return to them and refinance again. Instead what you want is to opt for a flat fixed rate mortgage. If you owed another 15 years at 8% fixed flat interest before the Cash Out, leaving with 20 years with 8% fixed flat isn't bad. The key to remember is that in Cash Out Refinancing, you are not getting the Cash Out for nothing. You are losing equity in your home, and you will have to pay for that. The key to making Lemonade is being aware of how you are paying for it, and making the repayment accountable and sustainable.

Wood Profits Banner About the Author
Dan Johnson enjoys writing about cash out refinancing.

Written by: Dan Johnson


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