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(9)Adverse Credit Remortgage: Refinance at Better Terms

 

         
Getting a remortgage with adverse credit is a daunting task and it is increasingly becoming a widespread problem in UK. An adverse credit remortgage is a type of mortgage, which is particularly used by people who have adverse remarks in their credit history.
Adverse credit ratings are rising as people are finding it difficult to repay the loans they took in order to remedy their financial exigencies. The credit ratings are remarks given by your previous creditors based on your repayment history. If you are punctual and prompt in repaying the installments they give you a positive remark and a negative rating incurs, if you miss their installments and are erratic in the repayment schedule.Lenders are wary of this negative or adverse credit rating. They find it risky to lend any amount to such persons and reject their applications in most of the cases.While, applying for an Adverse credit remortgage, the borrower has to face two kinds of situations. In the first case, although he has an adverse credit rating against him, he can offer something like a house or home equity as a collateral to the remortgage. In second case the borrower with the adverse credit history doesn't have anything to offer as collateral or the value of collateral is not adequate to guarantee the loan.The lenders, if they find that they can get something as collateral for the remortgage offer, are prompt in lending as compared to a situation where they have to lend solely on the basis of creditworthiness of the borrower. The lenders are comfortable by the fact that if the borrower defaults in payments, they can repossess the collateral. Depending on the collateral and creditworthiness, lenders fix interest rates, lending amount and the repayment schedules.
Remortgaging involves changing the mortgage without changing the existing house or property. Adverse credit remortgage can be used for getting a better deal on mortgage from a different lender. It can also be used to get an improved deal on mortgage from the existing lender. Adverse credit remortgage may also be used to provide funds or to get a loan on the increased equity in home or property. They are very useful in consolidating existing debts from various sources into one single manageable loan. Emergency expenditures like the purchase of a car, a holiday, some reconstruction or medical bills can be funded by such remortgages.
Getting an adverse credit remortgage to finance these purchases is considered a wise option because remortgage offers lower interest rates and easy repayment options as compared to other methods of borrowing.
People with adverse credit should be very cautious while taking a remortgage. Mortgage lenders in UK are squeezing such people with higher interest rates and unreasonable terms and conditions.
Remortgaging involves many fees, which increase the cost of the process. There are early redemption penalties, re-appraisal of property, solicitor fees, office and conveyance charges, which have to be taken into consideration while taking an adverse credit remortgage. The fact that a borrower has an adverse credit rating makes the situation even worse for him. As the lending market in UK is very competitive the borrower is advised to shop around for lenders, which offer zero product fees, cashback, free basic property valuation and minimum fee for legal and other expenses. A good lender, who provides adverse credit remortgage will negotiate the best possible deal on prepayment penalties for its client. Finding such a lender is not easy but ultimately it will be worth the effort.
For most of us, if we have something to offer as collateral, getting an adverse credit remortgage will be quite easy. The new lender will ask for all the documents and complete the formalities. If everything goes smoothly, it won't take long to get an adverse credit remortgage.
Andrew baker has done his masters in finance from CPIT. He is engaged in providing free, professional, and independent advice to the residents of the UK.He works for the Secured loan web site uk finance world for any type of uk secured and unsecured loan please visit http://www.ukfinanceworld.co.uk

About the Author
Andrew baker has done his masters in finance from CPIT. He is engaged in providing free, professional, and independent advice to the residents of the UK.He works for the Secured loan web site uk finance world for any type of uk secured and unsecured loan please visit http://www.ukfinanceworld.co.uk

Written by: Andrew Baker


(10)Adverse debt levels blight UK consumers personal finances.

 


Debt levels are at an all time high in the UK. The younger generation tend to be feeling the pinch the most, but parents are increasingly being required to bail them out, often at great expense to their own limited mortgage or retirement savings.

It has become almost accepted as a fact of life that graduates will begin their careers with a considerable level of personal debt. The Association of Investment Trust Companies found that on average students expected to graduate with £7,208 of debt, while parents believed it would be nearer to £9,741, however the real average was found to be currently running at £13,501. Graduates then need to service credit cards, take out a mortgage, then cover the payments, repay university loans, not to mention the pressure to start saving earlier, and save more, for their retirement, whilst the basic state pension increasingly becomes inadequate. The government revealed in June that student debt for 2009-04 was seven times higher than they were in 1994-95 and the Student Loans Company has shown that debts owed to them has risen to more than £13bn.

It is not only students who face financial difficulties early in life. Consumer Credit Counselling Services - Scotland, has indicated that young adults in general, under the age of 25, now account for more than 10 per cent of the estimated 32,000 people who have fallen into severe arrears on non-mortgage debts of more than £1 billion.

Malcolm Hurlston, Chairman of the Consumer Credit Counselling Services (CCCS) said, "It is noticeable that young people are accounting for an increasing proportion and the number of them seeking assistance has risen by about 25 per cent over the past two years or so."

Analysts have been bracing themselves for news of a sharp increase in adverse debt levels from the major high street banks following report figures of a 21 per cent increase in bad debts levels at Lloyds TSB. City analysts expect HBOS and Royal Bank of Scotland to declare that bad debt charges have risen by around 20% in their personal banking businesses, and Barclays, HSBC and Alliance & Leicester are all expected to tell a similar tale of rising loan defaults. Citigroup analysts are expecting bad debt charges from its retail banking division to rise about 24% in the first half of this year to £230m, while last year HBOS’s provisions for bad debt rose from £1bn to £1.2bn.

Keith Stevens, of the chartered accountants firm Wilkins Kennedy, said: "Creditors profit by lending money to people and collecting interest, and the longer they can keep that cycle going the better for them. Unless borrowers own property of significant value, it’s often not in creditors’ interest to call in their debts." He also continued that he believed some creditors were increasingly taking a hands-off approach, allowing debtors to pile up large amounts of debt, and then collecting interest and penalty charges for as long as borrowers were able to continue paying. This has lead to an increase in the number of borrowers filing for bankruptcy themselves when previously they would have been forced into it earlier by their lenders.

House repossessions have also significantly increased over the past year, with the Council of Mortgage Lenders announcing 4,640 home repossessions during the first half of 2009, compared with 3,070 for the last half of 2009. Government figures show that there has also been an increase in the number of homeowners being taken to court for mortgage arrears.

Some of the major banks and financial service providers have taken the initiative and started to help police the growing adverse debt problems with HSBC announcing that it will share their full credit record, of both positive and negative information, on its personal customers with other regulated financial services companies through the Experian, Equifax and CallCredit credit reference agencies, in efforts to keep tabs on its consumers' debt.

Michael Geoghegan, Chief Executive of HSBC said: "It is no more in the interests of a customer to borrow more money than they can afford than it is for a bank to lend them the money." The move has been widely heralded by analysts, as Michael Geoghegan added, "It is the only way to ensure that lenders properly understand the full financial exposure of customers before they let them sign up to debt that some simply can't afford."

This all comes amidst media pressure for financial firms to become more responsible. One case widely featured in the news concerns a couple who took out the £5,740 loan at 34.9% APR for house improvements, but they were already in arrears on two prior mortgages, and became unable to keep up the loan repayments. Over the course of the 15 year loan term the amount repayable had escalated to £384,000. Attempts by the loan company to still enforce the huge debt, eventually had to be fought off by the couple through the law courts.

The couple urged others considering taking out a loan to seek advice and to, "obviously read the small print and ask the questions that perhaps you don't think about at the time, and just make sure you know exactly what the consequences are should anything go wrong".

There are currently many sources of information to help consumers make decisions regarding their finances and debt levels. Financial comparison sites like Moneynet can provide impartial information on loans, mortgages, adverse credit, etc, to find the best product for individual circumstances. Consumer help sites like the National Debtline provide free confidential and independent advice on how to deal with debt problems, and the Citizens Advice Bureau are there with trained volunteers to help with legal, monetary and other problems, through a free, independent and confidential advice service.

The more help and information that is available to consumers and the more responsible the lending agencies become, the safer finance will be for the most vulnerable who are looking to borrow money, to prevent them getting into un-repayable levels of debt, however these services can only be of help if people actually use them.

Malcolm Hurlston of CCCS said, "We are advising about 4,000 people in Scotland and I would estimate that our figures represent only about one in eight of those who need help".

Financial education is something needs to be provided at an early stage to make people realise the importance of taking on the accountability for their own finances, as well as highlighting where to access help for when it is required. Budgeting is a subject many school leavers have little practical knowledge of, but one which they desperately need to be made aware of before they start to control their own finances.

Where there is existing advice or help, this must be made available and known to all in order to prevent more people getting too deeply into debt, or falling prey to loan sharks like the recent case of Mark Washington Johnson who has been jailed in Birmingham for nearly four years. Mr Johnson was found guilty of charging up to 8,000 per cent interest on loans, taking Social Security benefit books or National Insurance numbers as "security" for the unauthorised loans and then piling on default charges for missed payments. If we are to prevent this sort of abuse occurring to the weakest members of society then public awareness needs to be raised and the most vulnerable people given the assistance best suited to understand and control their own money.



About the Author
Richard lives in Edinburgh working for bigmouthmedia, occasionally writing for the personal finance blog Cashzilla, and considering the possibility of there being intelligent life on Earth.

Written by: Richard Green


(11)Alternative Venture Finance: Federal Grants and Loans


While most companies seeking venture capital initially think about angel investors and venture capitalists, a large alternative source of financing is federal grants and loans. The two largest federal grant programs are run by the Small Business Administration (SBA), and by Small Business Investment Companies (SBICs).

An SBA loan, regardless of whether it is a direct loan from the SBA, or, as is more common, a bank loan guaranteed by the SBA, is essentially a bank loan. The benefit of it versus a traditional bank loan is the rate. SBA rates are typically much less than traditional business loan rates.

In most cases, in a guaranteed SBA bank loan, the SBA guarantees 90 percent of the loan will be repaid to the bank. As such, banks are at much less risk than in most other loans, and are a bit more flexible with regards to who they offer these loans. However, the SBA usually requires the founders of the company to personally guarantee the loans, which makes them risky should the venture collapse.

Alternatively, Small Business Investment Companies (SBICs) are privately organized corporations that are licensed and regulated by the SBA. Small or emerging businesses which qualify for assistance from the SBIC program can receive equity capital and/or long-term loans from these companies. Essentially, these companies provide their own capital, which is supplemented by federal funds, to the companies they fund.

Interestingly, U.S. taxpayers benefit from the SBIC program as tax revenues generated from successful SBIC investments have more than covered the cost of the program. Likewise the program has created hundreds of thousands of jobs.

In summary, SBA and SBIC financing are viable alternatives to financing from angel investors and venture capitalists and should be considered in the capital raising process. Similarly to angel and VC financing, companies seeking SBA and SBIC financing need a strong management team and value proposition, and a highly professional and compelling business plan in order to raise the capital they need.

About the Author
As President of Growthink Business Plans, Dave Lavinsky has helped the company become one of the premier business plan development firms. Since its inception, Growthink has developed over 200 business plans. Growthink clients have collectively raised over $750 million in financing, launched numerous new product and service lines and gained competitive advantage and market share.

Written by: Dave Lavinsky


:(12)Are You Having Sleepless Nights Because Of Your Finances?.


You've worked hard all day and come home at night, only to discover that you can't get comfortable in your own bed. You toss and you turn for well over three hours. As 3a.m. approaches, you finally go to sleep but the alarm sounds all too quickly at 6 a.m. It's time for you to go to work. Day two comes and you're off again to the usual rat race. You repeat the same pattern once you get home. Later that night you lay in bed, thinking how you're going to pay all of these bills. Despite your best efforts on the job, including overtime, it doesn't seem to be enough. What can you do? Who can you to turn to?
Does this sound like you? Are you a Christian having sleepless nights because of your finances? Here are the top five reasons I have found why people get into debt:
1) Try to live beyond their means. Keep up with the Joneses. 2) Lost job and bills pile up 3) Have never been taught money management 4) Divorcing and the other party charged up cards in the process splitting up 5) Impulse Shopping
I too was a victim. Not from just one, but two of these debt catalysts. My husband equally had financial woes, his was still on this list. Being in debt has a way of having a hold on you and causes you not to think clearly. People in debt tend to operate out of fear - for example they ignore phone calls because it might be a collection agency on the other end. How many calls have they missed? Or perhaps, they write a check in the hopes that it will clear the bank; knowing full well they spent the money on luxuries and other needless excesses that have caused the bank account to have insufficient funds.
If any of this sounds like you or someone you know, assure them they can get out of debt without filing bankruptcy. They have to want help and not let pride or embarrassment get in their way of being helped.
At Journey To Wholeness, we work with people who want help getting their finances in order. There is no charge for our help. Why would you pay someone to help you get out of debt?

About the Author
Dr. Taffy Wagner is the author of Debt Dilemma. Debt Dilemma is her own personal story of how she got into debt and was able to get out without filing bankruptcy. She will be launching a national marketing campaign on October 18, 2009. View her website at http://www.paidoff.net/SpecialPromo.html for further details.

Written by: Taffy Wagner


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