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(265)Students investing in their future need to manage their finances today

 

With the A-level results coming out, the long wait for UK school leavers hoping to go to university will soon be over. All the hard work that has been put into achieving the grades required will now pay off and the fun and freedom that is student life can begin. This may have been the case in the past, but the notion that university life is socially and financially responsibility free is now lamentably outdated. These days, if you want to study beyond the age of 18, learning becomes very expensive.

According to the National Union of Students the typical cost of living expenses at a university outside London are around £8,600 a year for the essentials of food, rent, fuel, books and tuition. For students' studying in London they can expect to pay over £10,000 a year.

Barclays bank has calculated that currently the average graduate leaves university owing £13,501. Jeremy Law, the head of student and graduate banking at Barclays said, "students starting a three-year course this September could be graduating with debts of almost £20,000…graduates will find themselves with debts for years to come which may affect their ability to buy homes and invest in pensions…prince or pauper, these levels of debt may act as a deterrent to some people considering going to university."

With student debt growing every year - financial comparison sites like Moneynet are seeing an increased need for students to take control early and carefully plan for their future. Richard Brown, Chief Executive of Moneynet said “We all understand the importance of budgeting, but for students this can be especially difficult.”

HSBC has estimated that there will be a difference of around £6,400 between the average student’s income through loans and their total expenditure this year, making the skill of how to budget effectively a vitally important one to develop early on in a student’s life.

A spokesperson for the NUS said, "When you get your student loan it can seem like a lot of money. And for those who have never had to juggle lots of money before it can be difficult not to go out and blow it.”

There is help available from the NUS and other sources to students who get into financial difficulty. The NUS has set up advice centres which can provide support on money management as well as advice on how to access any other funds such as Higher Education Grants, Childcare Grants, Disabled Students' Allowance, Parents' Learning Allowance, as well as possible reduced rate loans, which may be available dependent on course subjects and individual circumstances.

An important issue for freshers to learn is that making careful financial choices early on, such as the right bank account, can help keep graduation debt to a minimum. By focusing on the interest rates, authorised and unauthorised overdraft borrowing rates, bank charges and ease of access to the money in their account, rather than the host of freebie sign-up gimmicks can make all the difference.

The NUS advises, “Students not to get a credit card as you will pay exactly the same high interest rates as everyone else”. In general, credit cards rarely carry genuinely privileged terms solely for students, however students can still utilise cheap forms of credit specifically devised for their circumstances, such as graduated interest-free overdrafts and low interest student loans, before resorting to a credit card if necessary.

Living at home will help to keep costs down, but for most students, this is frequently either not possible, or not desirable. The best way to make finances go further whilst at college is obviously to get some form of job that will fit in around studying. Although many employers do not like employees having irregular working hours due to external commitments, there are some employers who will veritably embrace students as they can fill in on a part-time basis to cover unsociable hours and holiday periods. Supermarkets, restaurants and bars are ideal for student work, as is working late shifts in large financial firms, or being a mystery shopper for research companies, or even becoming a film extra for £50 to £200 a day.

The real problem that needs to be in the minds of all students though is that any money that they borrow, whether it is through a loan or a credit card, must still be paid back at some point, even if that time may seem a long way off, and they expect to be earning a high salary. The truth is that there are more graduates leaving university every year, and there is increasing competition for what seems to be a dwindling graduate job market with diminishing pay rates. Students need to take control of their finances as early as possible in order to stop their finances taking control of them for a long time to come.



About the Author
Richard lives in Edinburgh, occasionally writing for the personal finance blog Cashzilla, hates Brassica oleracea var gemmifera (aka brussel sprouts).

Written by: Richard Green


(266)Take The Mystery Out Of Finances And Simplify Your Life

 

What is finance and what do you need to know? Finance can
mean different things. It may refer to your personal
financial situation. It could refer to your investments or a
business's investments. It could refer to a credit or loan
purchase.

Financing can be involved in your life in different ways.
For example, if you are going to invest in a large purchase
such as a house or even a car. Large furniture purchases and
credit cards all fall into these categories. Interest rates
are the most integral part of financing. Why else would a
company want to loan you money or offer you credit? How else
would they benefit? They benefit from the interest that you
have to pay in on financing your loan. There are different
types of financing options available.

The percentage rate is the amount of interest that you pay.
The percentage rate is the certain portion of your loan or
credit that you pay back in interest. For example, if your
loan was for $40,000 and your interest rate was 12.3% then
you would pay 12.3% of $40,000 in interest. The interest
would be added onto your $40,000 and you would pay it back
via your monthly payments.

Fixed rate: A fixed rate means your interest rate will stay
the same no matter what. People usually prefer these. If you
can get a low fixed rate, it will stay with you even if
other average interest rates are going up. Balloon rate: A
balloon rate can fluctuate with the times and the stock
market but depending on the situation, this can be
beneficial to you as well. You will have to decide which you
think is best for you.

There are different types of financing options as we
mentioned earlier. Probably the most common example of
finance in the United States is credit cards. A credit card
allows you to make purchases with the card. The bank issuing
the card will pay on your behalf and you then pay the bank
back, plus the interest. The bank makes money off the
interest and you get what you want right away.

The same thing applies to pay-as-you-go or rental furniture
companies. There are even rent-to-own housing services now
where your monthly rent can go towards buying the house if
you want to stay. Financing should be a way to help you
achieve something that you're going to be purchasing anyway.
Financing can get you in your house quicker than saving up
the cash. Become knowledgable and financing can be a tool
that will serve you well.




About the Author
The author has discovered that what you do NOT know about your finances can hurt you. She has shared her knowledge and tips about finances with thousands of people and helped them to have a good relationship with money and financial matters

Kathleen Sutera is founder of All About Finance an excellent resource site dedicated to information on finance
Written by: Kathleen Sutera


(267)Taking control of your finances.

 

  To find money to invest for your future, you need to make sure that your outgoing expenses are less than the income that you are receiving. You need to develop an excess that you can have free to invest.

Now before you start to think...."well I don't have any excess left...if I was earning more money....then I would have some free". Let me dispel this myth...and tell you that it is a known and excepted fact that the amount of money that people earn has little if any bearing on whether or not they have an excess left to invest. The only way to create an excess it to spend less than you earn, instead of spending all that you earn.

Even doctors and lawyers, who earn well over $100,000.00 per year, often end up at retirement with little more Net Worth than factory or office workers.

Net Worth is calculated by deducting the value of all the liabilities or loans you have from the income-producing assets owned to give you the net value of your income-producing assets.

Why aren't high-income earners retiring wealthy? Why don't they end up with a greater Net Worth than someone on a low income? It is quite simple. Human nature seems to dictate that whatever anyone earns....they spend....some even spend more than they earn and charge it on their credit card.

The higher your income grows...the more you spend and the only way to get out of this cycle is to realise that it is happening, and make a concerted effort to reverse this habit....and to begin reducing your expenditures so that you can free up money to invest.

The best way to do this, is to try the 20/80 plan. This plan simply means that as soon as you receive your pay....you put aside 10% for God, 10% of it for investment....and then use the other 80% to live off of. Put aside the 20%, and then pay all the bills and do the grocery shopping....and then after that whatever is left over you can spend.

Most people do it the wrong way around...they pay the bills, do the shopping and spend what is left over, never leaving any left to save or invest. By taking the investment money out first you will alleviate the temptation to spend it.

The road to wealth is not determined by how much you earn, but by how you utilise the income you have and how much you save and invest.

You need to take control of your finances. One of the best ways to start having more control over your money is to find out where it has all been going, and then amend your spending habits to allow you to live within the 20/80 plan.

If you write down a list of your monthly net income, then in another column write down a list of the essential items that you have to spend money on. You should be able to work out an average for telephone, gas, electricity, insurances and rates, from your previous bills. Work out an average of how much is spent on grocery shopping and petrol. If there are any other necessary utilities include them as well. Then deduct the second column from the first - and this will give you the maximum potential savings for each month.

It can be quite startling how high this figure can be and make you wonder where all the extra money went.

Another good learning experience is to simply write down for a fortnight every dollar spent and write next to it what it was for. You will soon find that there are a lot of unnecessary expenses, often caused by impulse buying, where you have spent money on items that you neither needed or really wanted, and could easily have gone without.

When you can begin to recognise these areas, and start to consider whether or not you are spending your money wisely, before you hand it over, then you will be beginning to take control over your money and are well on the way to embarking on your investment journey, which will enable you to have a financially secure future for you and your children.

Visit my website at To find money to invest for your future, you need to make sure that your outgoing expenses are less than the income that you are receiving. You need to develop an excess that you can have free to invest.

Now before you start to think...."well I don't have any excess left...if I was earning more money....then I would have some free". Let me dispel this myth...and tell you that it is a known and excepted fact that the amount of money that people earn has little if any bearing on whether or not they have an excess left to invest. The only way to create an excess it to spend less than you earn, instead of spending all that you earn.

Even doctors and lawyers, who earn well over $100,000.00 per year, often end up at retirement with little more Net Worth than factory or office workers.

Net Worth is calculated by deducting the value of all the liabilities or loans you have from the income-producing assets owned to give you the net value of your income-producing assets.

Why aren't high-income earners retiring wealthy? Why don't they end up with a greater Net Worth than someone on a low income? It is quite simple. Human nature seems to dictate that whatever anyone earns....they spend....some even spend more than they earn and charge it on their credit card.
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The higher your income grows...the more you spend and the only way to get out of this cycle is to realise that it is happening, and make a concerted effort to reverse this habit....and to begin reducing your expenditures so that you can free up money to invest.

The best way to do this, is to try the 20/80 plan. This plan simply means that as soon as you receive your pay....you put aside 10% for God, 10% of it for investment....and then use the other 80% to live off of. Put aside the 20%, and then pay all the bills and do the grocery shopping....and then after that whatever is left over you can spend.

Most people do it the wrong way around...they pay the bills, do the shopping and spend what is left over, never leaving any left to save or invest. By taking the investment money out first you will alleviate the temptation to spend it.

The road to wealth is not determined by how much you earn, but by how you utilise the income you have and how much you save and invest.

You need to take control of your finances. One of the best ways to start having more control over your money is to find out where it has all been going, and then amend your spending habits to allow you to live within the 20/80 plan.

If you write down a list of your monthly net income, then in another column write down a list of the essential items that you have to spend money on. You should be able to work out an average for telephone, gas, electricity, insurances and rates, from your previous bills. Work out an average of how much is spent on grocery shopping and petrol. If there are any other necessary utilities include them as well. Then deduct the second column from the first - and this will give you the maximum potential savings for each month.

It can be quite startling how high this figure can be and make you wonder where all the extra money went.

Another good learning experience is to simply write down for a fortnight every dollar spent and write next to it what it was for. You will soon find that there are a lot of unnecessary expenses, often caused by impulse buying, where you have spent money on items that you neither needed or really wanted, and could easily have gone without.

When you can begin to recognise these areas, and start to consider whether or not you are spending your money wisely, before you hand it over, then you will be beginning to take control over your money and are well on the way to embarking on your investment journey, which will enable you to have a financially secure future for you and your children.

To find money to invest for your future, you need to make sure that your outgoing expenses are less than the income that you are receiving. You need to develop an excess that you can have free to invest.

Now before you start to think...."well I don't have any excess left...if I was earning more money....then I would have some free". Let me dispel this myth...and tell you that it is a known and excepted fact that the amount of money that people earn has little if any bearing on whether or not they have an excess left to invest. The only way to create an excess it to spend less than you earn, instead of spending all that you earn.

Even doctors and lawyers, who earn well over $100,000.00 per year, often end up at retirement with little more Net Worth than factory or office workers.

Net Worth is calculated by deducting the value of all the liabilities or loans you have from the income-producing assets owned to give you the net value of your income-producing assets.

Why aren't high-income earners retiring wealthy? Why don't they end up with a greater Net Worth than someone on a low income? It is quite simple. Human nature seems to dictate that whatever anyone earns....they spend....some even spend more than they earn and charge it on their credit card.

The higher your income grows...the more you spend and the only way to get out of this cycle is to realise that it is happening, and make a concerted effort to reverse this habit....and to begin reducing your expenditures so that you can free up money to invest.

The best way to do this, is to try the 20/80 plan. This plan simply means that as soon as you receive your pay....you put aside 10% for God, 10% of it for investment....and then use the other 80% to live off of. Put aside the 20%, and then pay all the bills and do the grocery shopping....and then after that whatever is left over you can spend.

Most people do it the wrong way around...they pay the bills, do the shopping and spend what is left over, never leaving any left to save or invest. By taking the investment money out first you will alleviate the temptation to spend it.

The road to wealth is not determined by how much you earn, but by how you utilise the income you have and how much you save and invest.

You need to take control of your finances. One of the best ways to start having more control over your money is to find out where it has all been going, and then amend your spending habits to allow you to live within the 20/80 plan.

If you write down a list of your monthly net income, then in another column write down a list of the essential items that you have to spend money on. You should be able to work out an average for telephone, gas, electricity, insurances and rates, from your previous bills. Work out an average of how much is spent on grocery shopping and petrol. If there are any other necessary utilities include them as well. Then deduct the second column from the first - and this will give you the maximum potential savings for each month.

It can be quite startling how high this figure can be and make you wonder where all the extra money went.

Another good learning experience is to simply write down for a fortnight every dollar spent and write next to it what it was for. You will soon find that there are a lot of unnecessary expenses, often caused by impulse buying, where you have spent money on items that you neither needed or really wanted, and could easily have gone without.

When you can begin to recognise these areas, and start to consider whether or not you are spending your money wisely, before you hand it over, then you will be beginning to take control over your money and are well on the way to embarking on your investment journey, which will enable you to have a financially secure future for you and your children.

Visit the authors web site at http://members.optushome.com.au/dlohrere/

About the Author
Debra has spent several years researching the powerful medium of property investment and speaking with hundreds of other property investors. She has discovered many different strategies that have been used and the ones that have worked best. She now writes books and articles about property investment, goal setting, budgeting and how to create financial security for retirement


Written by: Debra Lohrere


(268)The Advantages of Refinance

 

Refinance - If you have at one time or another bought a home, then you
probably heard of the term "refinance." But what is refinance, exactly? Let's
go down to the basics. The term financing refers to the act of providing a
certain amount of money to an individual in order to buy a home, a car, a real
estate property, et cetera. Loans and mortgages are actually types of
financing. Now, when we say "refinance", therefore, it means that we are still
providing a certain amount of money. The prefix "re-" actually points to the
idea that you will be basically taking a new mortgage or loan to replace an old
one.


The Advantages of Refinance
Financial analysts will claim that refinance is a great option for
buyers when interest rates are low. The reason for this is quite obvious.
Refinance mortgages or loans allow you to take new loans for a relatively lower
interest rate. Low interest rates mean low monthly repayments. And low monthly
repayments mean bigger savings for you. Of course, this only works if, and only
if, the rates are low. If the rates are high, refinance is not advisable.

Another advantage of refinancing your mortgage loan is that the move
will allow you to change loan terms from a long one to something shorter. With
a shorter loan term, you can pay off your loan amount much sooner, thus
allowing you to save more on your overall interest payments. Other Benefits of
Refinance.


Besides bigger savings on your monthly bills, a refinance mortgage or
loan provides you greater loan satisfaction. For instance, if you find that the
terms of your current loan are unsatisfactory, you can switch to another lender
with a refinance loan. You can use the money you get from your refinance loan
to pay off your old loan. In addition to that, refinancing gives you the option
to change your lending company whose services or programs make you unhappy or
unsatisfied.

Refinance is also a good way to consolidate your monthly bills. Don't
you just find it such a complete headache to receive all sorts of bills every
month? Bills which are very confusing and very time-consuming to sort? You can
get rid of this problem with a mortgage refinance. Getting a second loan will
allow you to consolidate all your debts into one single monthly bill. Debt
consolidation is especially beneficial which aside from lessening the hassle
you'd have to go through, it also reduces the possibility of a bill forgotten
or a debt going unpaid.
Tony Forster has a keen interest in living debt free having been "up to his ears" before realizing the need to take control. He has compiled an online financial article resource at http://www.loan4payday.info


Written by: Tony


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