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  (97)Herbal Remedies To Prevent Travelers Diarrhea

 

Travelers visiting many tropical, sub-tropical and developing countries run an increased risk of suffering a gastrointestinal illness. These are usually caused by bacteria, parasites and viruses. The microscopic bugs at the top of these rather gut wrenching (for all the wrong reasons...) charts are E Coli, the staphylococci, shigella and salmonella species, campylobacter jejuni, cryptosporidiosis, and hepatitis A.

Infected food is the biggest culprit, with water coming in second. Ice cream, cocktails served in re-used coconut shells, raw seafood, ice, and food from street vendors are potential risks that can interrupt your adventure with less salacious memories to pass on to family and friends.

The nausea, stomach cramps and diarrhea from such acute infections usually sorts itself out after a few days (unless of course you have contracted hepatitis A, or something like giardia). Certainly, if you are unlucky enough to be sick after a few days, you should see a doctor.

Fortunately, there are remedies you can take that will strengthen your immune and digestive system and hopefully give your body a better chance at dealing with its new environment. The herbs I describe below would make an excellent travelers mix. The best form to take them in would be as a tincture, which can be made up by going to a local herbal dispensary if you have one in your area, or alternatively, a local herbalist.

Astragalus (Astragalus membranaceus)

Astragalus is a good anti-viral, anti-bacterial, and anti-microbial. The polysaccharides in it support the immune system. Astragalus increases the activity of phagocytes, natural killer cells, and the levels of antibodies in the blood.

Picrorrhiza (Picrorrhiza kurroa)

This is an Ayurvedic herb that is best given in low doses, as higher doses can cause diarrhea and flatulence in more sensitive people. Its a bitter herb, so it stimulates the digestive system. It is also anti-malarial, supports the immune system, and protects the liver. Picrorrhiza encourages all aspects of the immune system, such as B and T cell activity, and the activity of phagocytes. This herb is used in Ayurvedic medicine for liver related problems and immune problems.

Goldenseal (Hydrastis Canadensis)

Goldenseal is a gut antibiotic, which for example helps reduce adhesive e coli, and encourages some immune functions of the body. For example, berberine, which is one of its active constituents, has been shown to increase the activity of macrophages, which digest bacteria and viruses. Barberry also contains berberine, so more information on this very valuable constituent is below. Goldenseal, being a bitter herb, it is also good for the digestive system. If you are pregnant or suffer from hypertension, however, you should not take goldenseal.

Barberry (Berberis Vulgaris)

Berberine, one of the active constituents in this herb is an anti protozoic, which helps protect travelers against giardia, leishmania, and treponema pallidum. Other notable effects of berberine are its activity against giardia, dysentery, and candida, as well as the cholera vibrio. The active constituents berberine and palmatine are also anti-bacterial. And berbamine, which like berberine is an alkaloid, is a strong anti-bacterial which seems to work by increasing white blood cells and platelets. The constituent palamtine is a uterine stimulant, however, and as such pregnant women shouldn't take this herb. Barberry is another gut antibiotic, but it is also anti-malarial (though no self-respecting herbalist would recommend anything other than doctor's treatment if you do contract malaria).

Echinacea (Echinacea purpurea or augustifolia)

Echinacea is an immune stimulant. Its main active constituents are the polysaccharides and the alkamides (especially the isobutylamides), which are both immune stimulating, and the polyaceytlenes, which are antibacterial, anti-viral, and anti-fungal. Echinacea supports the activity of phagocytes, which are part of the immune system, and is also considered anti-viral and anti-microbial. One of the ways echinacea appears to work is by inhibiting the action of the enzyme hyaluronidase. This enzyme is used by micro-organisms to break down the connective tissue that prevents them from entering and spreading through the body. For these reasons, it is excellent as part of a travelers remedy mix.

These remedies are not designed as a prophylactic, like a vaccine. They work on the principle of giving your body an increased chance at staying healthy. But nothing replaces common sense. Wash your hands before eating. Don't drink ice or from water bottles where the seal has been broken. Drink cocktails in glasses, not cute but probably old coconut shells. Don't eat anything fresh that you can't peel. Don't eat ice cream or drink unpasteurized milk. Be wary of eating from street vendors. Some people do, and are fine. But they are a risk factor with gastrointestinal upsets. Its a good idea to pack some oral hydration salts as a precaution.

But above all, enjoy your holiday!

Refrences: C Fisher & G Painter, Materia Medica of Western Herbs for the Southern Hemisphere

Class notes from Ses Salmond, certified Natural Therapist and Herbal Medicine teacher

About the author:

Rebecca Prescott is the author of the website www.vitaminstohealth.com which publishes information on herbs such as echinacea, and provides natural alternatives for many common health problems.

Written by: Rebecca Prescott


(98)HeroVacations.com Adds Numerous Golf & Travel Packages to Web Site

HeroVacatons.com has recently added an extensive array of golf and travel packages to its Web site. There are numerous destinations and packages from which to choose.

Orlando, FL (PRWEB) May 9, 2009 -- HeroVacations.com, a Web site that serves the leisure and group travel needs of the associates of the Department of Homeland Security, has recently added an extensive array of golf and travel packages to its Web site through its affiliate partners. The all-inclusive golf packages feature destinations that cater to the avid golf enthusiast as well as to the golfer who just wants to get away for the weekend, play a little golf and spend some time with family. There are numerous destinations and packages from which to choose.

“This is one of many enhancements that will occur over the next few months as the Web site develops into a ‘one stop’ shop for our targeted audiences,” states
President Larry Davis.

The site currently offers discount rates on an array of travel necessities such as hotel rooms (more than 16,000 in 85 countries worldwide), car rentals and airfare with all the major providers and air carriers and cruises on the top cruise lines in the market. As a bonus, Web users can build their own road trips up to within six hours of their homes, chose hundreds of campsites and even rent vacation homes in many countries.

HeroVacations.com also offers plenty of other travel packages for those who are more interested in relaxation. The site includes packages of all price points to more than 700 destinations in the United States, Europe the Caribbean and Mexico. Interestingly, many packages are available to cities that one may not necessarily think of at first but the price and inclusions make them quite attractive for even budget traveler.

Next on the agenda, states Davis, “is to add more aggressive travel specials to
the preferred destinations for our clientele. We expect to make an announcement soon regarding a partnership with a major hotel company to provide specials in these destinations. Additionally, plans include offering full ski packages in time for the winter ski season.”

HeroVacations.com is a privately held marketing company that provides travel opportunities through affiliate partnerships and individual contracts. The principles have more than 75 years of experience in the travel industry. For more information, please visit http://www.herovacations.com.

About the Author

Larry Davis
President
407-737-3510
http://www.herovacations.com


Written by: Larry Davis


(99)Highway Madness: Holiday Travel In New Jersey

 

My family decided to brave the state's highway system one recent Thanksgiving by traveling the New Jersey Turnpike south to my sister's house off of Exit 7A. We started on Exit 18, knowing full well that we would hit some traffic before we arrived at her home some 70 miles later. Little did we know that our trip would be a bit of an adventure: not the type we would have liked to participated in either.

It was shortly after the noon hour when our car passed through the EZPass booth. We soon found ourselves traveling past Newark Liberty Airport and the "bucolic beauty" of industrial Linden, NJ. Choosing the car-only lanes seemed most sensible; with enough big rigs and buses on the road we didn't want to subject our midsize car to the wake of a tandem trailer whooshing on by. Soon after making that decision we noticed brake lights more than one mile down the road and a helicopter hovering overhead. Uh oh, this did not look good.

As we arrived near the stopped traffic, police cars and emergency vehicles screamed by along the shoulder. Within ten minutes we were upon the scene: a green minivan had gone off the road and flipped on its side. We didn't want to stare too closely but it did look like as if a small tree was sticking out of the windshield. We all said a prayer for the inhabitants and were thanking God that the rescue workers were already there doing what they do best. Moments later the traffic broke and we found ourselves once again heading south on the turnpike with not a little bit of thanks to God on our part that we were safe.

Holiday travel in New Jersey is fun. Okay, barely tolerable is more like it. If you have family more than 25 miles away, more than likely you will be on one of the major roadways at some point in your trip. It seemed, at times, that the entire New Jersey populace was going where we were going. I only hoped that my sister had a large enough turkey for everyone.

By Exit 8A, traffic had slowed again so we decided to exit the turnpike and follow Route 130 south. Not a great choice as Route 130 is a four lane roadway desperately needing more lanes and less traffic lights. Still, we felt that it beat the turnpike parking lot syndrome.

Near Cranbury we began to experience deja vu all over again as the saying goes. Stopped traffic. Sirens. Emergency vehicles spotted in front of us. The entire highway closed and traffic rerouted. Unlike the previous accident, we weren't going to witness the rescue attempt. So, we said some more prayers for the victims, exited Route 130, and found ourselves following other cars through the town of Cranbury.

At this point, we were in unfamiliar territory, but I didn't mind it. Cranbury is a lovely historic town that seems set in the mid-19th century. Nothing is new, everything is preserved. If you must be detoured somewhere in New Jersey, this town is the place to visit. Tastefully decked out in Christmas splendor, Cranbury looks nicer than Walgreen's town of Perfect. It isn't perfect, but it is real!

Somehow by following signs -- there are places in New Jersey where signs will get you where you are going -- we arrived at my sister's home. We shared our stories of accident scenes witnessed, a detour taken, and a town admired. The highway madness of earlier that day soon faded away as we enjoyed the company of family and our Thanksgiving feast.

In the early evening we decided to take our tired children and head home. Traffic was much lighter and it moved quickly. Heading north on the New Jersey Turnpike, we decided to exit the road and travel north on the Garden State Parkway, which would bring us closer to our home. What had been a two hour trip down was looking like a 75 minute sprint home. Everything was clear and seemed uneventful. How soon that would change.

We noticed in the vicinity of the Union tolls that traffic was slowing down. At first, we chalked it up to the usual bobbing and weaving one must do in order to find the correct toll lane. However, as we made the approach to the tolls we looked over to the southbound lane and saw the all too familiar scenery of emergency vehicles. Not again.

This time the scene seemed even more horrific. Pulled off the road just south of the toll booths was a public transit bus. A police officer stood outside shining a light through the broken passenger windows. We could see all the windows were blown out by a fire that appeared to have consumed the bus. None of us wanted to imagine what happened; we simply grimaced and said yet another prayer to Almighty God for mercy.

The remainder of the trip home found our car engulfed in silence. Looking back, I certainly can give thanks for not being involved in any one of the three accidents. We don't know if any produced fatalities, but we do know that lives were changed that day. Whether people were speeding, cut off, falling asleep behind the wheel, or for whatever other reason the accident happened, we will never know. Quite frankly, it no longer mattered.

What we do know is this: even under the best conditions and in the best weather, road trips cannot be taken for granted. New Jersey roads are crowded, but serious accidents occur all over the country. That is why our family prays for traveling mercies before we take an extended trip and why we are quick to hold victims up in prayer when we come upon an accident scene. Life is too precious to do anything less.

This article originally appeared on Townstead.com, a defunct site managed by Matt Keegan. It was part of his "Life in New Jersey" series of articles.
About the Author

Matthew Keegan is the owner of a successful article writing, web design, and marketing business based in North Carolina, USA. He manages several sites including the http://www.corporateflyer.net>Corporate Flight Attendant Community and the http://www.aviationemploymentboard.net>Aviation Employment Board.

Written by: Matthew C. Keegan


(100)Hilton Head Island Travel Guide

Hilton Head Island Travel Guide By Jeff Palmer

Hilton Head Island was the first ecologically-planned destination in The United States. Light pollution ordinances are in effect across the island to protect the habits of the loggerhead turtles which sometimes confuse the lights of dwellings and street lights with that of the ocean. Protections are in place to protect the beautiful live oaks and palmetto trees which cover the island. Salt marshes, beaches and lagoons remain in pristine condition across the island. While modern conveniences such as shopping malls and five star hotels are widely available; care has been taken to blend these structures into the native ecology as much as possible.

The 2.5 million travelers who arrive annually to Hilton Head Island find an infinite variety of activities and reasons for visiting. Whether they are searching for a world class golf vacation, relaxing on the miles of sandy beaches or enjoying the gentle sway of palm trees in unspoiled nature, a stay on Hilton Head Island is sure to pleasethe most discerning of vacationers.

Hilton Head Island is home to the Heritage Classic golf championship and the Celebrity golf tournament. With an average yearly temperature of 70 degrees, visitors to the island are sure to enjoy year round golf on any of the 24 golf courses located on Hilton Head. There are also another 40 golf courses to be found in thesurrounding area, just a short distance from the island.

Tennis enthusiasts can enjoy the many professional courts available on Hilton Head. With over 300 courts to chose from there is no shortage of playing opportunities. Professional tennis instructors are also available to those wishing to improve their games.

With over twelve miles of sandy beaches overlooking the Atlantic Ocean, water lovers will find that Hilton Head Island is a coastal paradise. Whether you just want to relax in the sun or try your hand at scuba diving, waterskiing or dolphin watching there's is something for everyone on the island. Fishing charters, kayak tours, wind-surfing, island cruises and all manner of water activities are available.

If you really want to see the island consider renting a bicycle from one of the numerous bike rental outfits.With miles of bike paths available, many of which take you through nature preserves, this is truly an enjoyable way to experience the natural splendor of the island. At low tide, the beaches of Hilton Head make an excellent bike riding surface.

Over 250 restaurants of every price range and cuisine dot the island. Fresh seafood abounds. From five star formal restaurants to fast food and everything in between, every taste and budget is catered to here.

There are a variety of accommodations available in several price ranges. From hotels to villas, condos to timeshares, you are sure to find lodging which fits your taste and budget.

If you a considering a vacation which includes gorgeous weather, miles of beaches, world class golf, entertainment and dining then explore the many offerings available on Hilton Head Island. For a complete directory of information about the island including accommodations, golf and dining visit http://www.hiltonheadislander.com


 

About the Author

Jeff Palmer is a web designer and search engine optimization specialist living in South Carolina Hiltonheadislander.com

Written by: Jeff Palmer


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